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History of Cambria County, V.1

CHAPTER V.

PIONEER SETTLERS--ADAMS FAMILY---PRINCE GALLITZIN--CAPTAIN MICHAEL M'GUIRE
--JOSEPH JOHNS--HE LAYS OUT THE VILLAGE OF CONEMAUGH.


     The best proof that is now obtainable leads to the conclusion that Samuel, Solomon, and Rachel Adams were the first white people to locate, improve and till the soil on land within the limits of Cambria county. It seems that the Adams family came from Berks county some time prior to 1774, and improved the Peter Snyder tract of land, which later became the Horner estate in the Seventh ward. The exact date cannot be fixed, but it was not prior to April 3, 1769, as, by the act of the provincial authorities, no white man was permitted to locate on land which had been reserved by treaty with the Indians for their exclusive use; however, it was prior to 1771.
     It will be observed that Charles Campbell took out a warrant on April 3, 1769. It is probable that the Adamses did the same then, or soon thereafter; at least, the deeds show that in 1774 Peter Snider took out a warrant for the "Solomon Adams Improvement" on "both side, of Solomon's Run" (in the Seventh ward). The records do not show that Solomon Adams took out a warrant; but that, he occupied it and made improvements on it there is no doubt.
     During this period (1769-1774) the white man and the red man were in a war, which had practically been circumscribed to the territory between Bedford and Pittsburg, and especially in and around Bedford, Ligonier, and points between them. The near-by forts were at Bedford and Ligonier, and one was at Fort Palmer, a few miles south of Lockport and near Covodesville. When danger from the warlike Indian was apprehended the Adamses would flee to one of these points.
     In 1777 the Tull family, who resided on the mountains six miles west of Bedford, consisting of father, mother, nine daughters, and a son, were massacred, excepting the son, who was absent. The hill is yet known as the Tull Hill on account of the terrible vengeance of the Indians on this occasion.
     Sherman Day gives an account of the courageous action and death of Samuel Adams as follows:


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Created: 3 Feb 2006, Last Updated: 30 Mar 2008
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