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History of Cambria County, V.2

HISTORY OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 379
Army of the Potomac, March 7, 1865
General Orders No. 10.
    In accordance with the requirements of General Orders No. 19 of 1862, from the War Department, and in conformity with the reports of boards convened to examine into the services rendered by the troops concerned and by the authority of the lieutenant-general commanding armies of the United States. It is ordered that there shall be inscribed upon the colors or guidons of the following regiments and batteries serving in this army the names of the battles in which they have borne a meritorious part, and as hereinafter specified: * * * Twenty-first Pennsylvania Cavalry: Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Weldon Railroad, Poplar Spring church, Boydton Road, Belfield.
    By command of
MAJ.-GEN. MEADE.
Army of the Potomac, March 7, 1865
General Orders No. 10.
    It is ordered that there shall be inscribed upon the colors or guidons of the following regiments and batteries serving in this army the names of the battles in which they have borne a meritorious part, and as hereafter specified: * * * One Hundred and Ninety-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers: Peebles' Farm, Hatcher's Run.
    By command of MAJ.-GEN. MEADE.
    GEORGE D. RUGGLES, Asst. Adj.-Gen.



    On December 6, Gen. Warren's 5th Corps. (Capt. Stackhouse) and Gen. Mott's division of Hancock's 2d (Capt. Fite) and Gregg's cavalry (Capt. Black) started on a raid to destroy the Petersburg & Weldon railroad, and succeeded in doing so as far as Hicksford, on the Meherrin river. A. P. Hill's Confederate corps failing to intercept Warren, he completed the destruction and returned to his camps.
    Grant and Lee went into winter quarters, and nothing was done during that period except that both armies extended and strengthened their lines. Lee extended his up the south side of Hatcher's Run, to the point where the Boydton plank road crosses it. A. P. Hill held the right wing from Hatcher's Run to Fort Gregg; Gordon and R. H. Anderson held it from Hill's left to the Appomattox, and Longstreet from the Appomattox to the extreme confederate left, north of the James river, at White Oak swamp. The entire length of his line was about 37 miles, eight of which were north of the James river, and on December 30 Lee had about 59,000 men to cover them.


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Created: 25 Mar 2003, Last Updated: 30 Mar 2008
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Lynne Canterbury, Diann Olsen and contributors