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History of Cambria County, V.2

HISTORY OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 203
    Thursday, May 11. I found Brig. Gen I. H. Duval stationed there; * * he had already paroled a large part of Rosser's men. * * I therefore returned to Charlottesville, Arriving on the 14th. Gen. Rosser, up to the time of my departure had made no visible preparation for paroling the remainder of his men, nor was there any tangible evidence of his intention to turn over any rebel government property whatever. After several interviews with him I ascertained that the men of his command were entirely dispersed, and would only come in in small detachments, or singly, to be paroled. * * Gen. Rosser admitted that about 9 pieces of artillery were concealed somewhere about Staunton, and 4 pieces at Lexington, also about 8 pieces at Pittsylvania Court House. * * The large number of negroes here will require for some time the interposition of military authority to adjust differences in regard to labor, property and personal rights. * *
FRANKLIN A. STRATTON, Lieut.-Colonel.

    The Itinerary of the 11th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company G. from January 1 to July 1, 1865:

    1865.
    January. The brigade has been engaged during the month in performing picket duty, scouting, drilling and officers' recitations. No change in the headquarters of the brigade or regiments.
    February. The same.
    Saturday, April 1. The command left the vicinity of Ream's Station, Va., where it had been on duty as guard to the wagon trains of the Army of the Potomac. Proceeded to Dinwiddie Court House and reported to Maj. Gen. Sheridan.
    Monday, 3. The command moved to Appomattox at two points, the lower at Leonard's Mills, the other three miles higher up the stream, picking up 300 prisoners and taking 4 guns.
    Tuesday, 4. The command crossed Deep Creek after a sharp skirmish.
    April 6, 7 and 8. It moved through Jetersville. Burkeville and Prince Edward Court House to Appomattox Station, skirmishing considerably on the road.
    Wednesday, 12. After the surrender of General Lee's army, the command was ordered to Lynchburg, Va., shere it remained until the 16th instant, engaged in paroling prisoners and destroying munitions of war.
    Sunday, 16. The Command moved, via Burkeville and Goode's Bridge, to Richmond, Va., where it arrived on the wrth instant, going into camp on the Mechanicsville road, where it has since remained.
    May. This brigade has remained in camp on the Mechanicsville road, about three miles north of Richmond, Va., during the entire month. It has been engaged in performing the ordi-


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Created: 21 Mar 2003, Last Updated: 30 Mar 2008
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