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History of Cambria County, V.2

HISTORY OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 141
the enemy that I was compelled to stop taking them to the rear, and simply disarm them and turn them out over the barricade to be taken charge of by the cavalry, who were in the open field on our right and rear.
    The casualties in my regiment were, under the circumstances, surprisingly small, which I attribute to the impetuosity of their charge upon the enemy, who were not given time to rally with anything like order or concert of action in their own defense.
    The number of men of my command in the engagement was 394. Companies B and G having been left in the rear of the batteries to keep up the skirmish line on the left and guard against surprise from that direction.
    The only commissioned officer wounded was my adjutant, W. H. Rose, who received a painful but not a dangerous wound in the left while gallantly cheering on the men in front of the position held by Brigadier-General Jones. Only 2 men of my regiment were killed and 27 wounded, a list of whom accompanies this report. This does not include some 40 whose wounds are so slight that they have not been reported to the hospital.
    It would be invidious to mention officers or men by name conspicuous for acts of bravery upon the field. All behaved most gallantly; each did all that could be expected of brave men, and all are equally entitled to the thanks and gratitude of their commanding officers.
City Point, Va., August 1, 1864.
Major-General Halleck:
    I am sending General Sheridan for temporary duty whilst the enemy is being expelled from the border. Unless General Hunter is in the field in person, I want Sheridan put in command of all the troops in the field, with instructions to put himself south of the enemy and follow him to the death. Wherever the enemy goes, let our troops go also. * * *
U. S. GRANT, Lieutenant-General

Washington, August 3, 1864, 2:30 p. m.
Lieutenant-General Grant,
City Point, Va.:
    I have seen your dispatch in which you say, “I want Sheridan put in command of all the troops in the field, with instructions to put himself south of the enemy and follow him to the death. Wherever the enemy goes let our troops go also.” This, I think, is exactly right as to how our forces should move, but please look over the dispatches you may have received from here even since you made that order, and discover, if you can, that there is any idea in the head of any one here of “putting our army south of the enemy,” or of “following him to the death” in any direction. I repeat to you it will neither be done nor attempted, unless you watch it every day and hour and force it.
A. LINCOLN, President


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Created: 19 Mar 2003, Last Updated: 30 Mar 2008
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